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In The News

  • The unintended consequences of prosecuting low-level crimes

    New York Amsterdam News

    With momentum toward closing the dysfunctional jails on Rikers Island and continuing reductions in crime, New York City is making progress toward a better justice system. Despite steps in the right direction, the road to shuttering Rikers is paved with hard decisions and, most importantly, the recognition that our criminal courts are not the solution for all of society’s ills. This reality is in the spotlight because of Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance’s recent decision not to prosecute most people who are arrested for jumping subway turnstiles.

  • Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, if passed, would complicate active shooter situations in NYC, expert says

    amNewYork

    Legislation that would give concealed carry permit holders from other states the ability to walk the streets of New York City with a gun at their hip would cause major complications for the NYPD, according to a Second Amendment expert.

    The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act was passed by the House of Representatives in December and is currently awaiting a vote in the Senate, but Congress would be “foolish” to approve it, said Saul Cornell, Fordham University’s Paul and Diane Guenther Chair in American History.

  • Kidnappers Now Accepting Cryptocurrencies

    RealDaily

    Cryptocurrencies promise to make all kinds of payments easier, including, it now appears, paying a ransom.

    In December the New York District Attorney announced an arrest in a kidnapping.

    “This case demonstrates the increasingly common intersection between cyber and violent crime — the defendant is charged with coordinating an elaborate kidnapping, armed robbery, and burglary to gain access to the victim’s digital wallet and the significant funds it contained,” said New York District Attorney Cyrus Vance, Jr.

  • Disbarred Attorney Paul Karan Pleads Guilty to Grand Larceny

    JDJournal

    An 81-year-old former attorney pleaded guilty to grand larceny and scheme to defraud on Thursday in the Manhattan Supreme Court, according to a NY Daily News report. Paul Karan, a now disbarred attorney, stole roughly $2.6 million from his clients’ trusts and estates from April 2005 and August 2016.

  • Statement by Manhattan District Attorney and Prosecutors Against Gun Violence Co-Founder Cyrus Vance, Jr. on Mass Shootings in America

    The Manhattan District Attorney

    “Congress has outsourced federal gun policy to the NRA. The only way to disrupt what has become ritual slaughter is with gun controls based on public health and safety, not on the business interests of a single industry. There is a reason why the United States is the only country where these atrocities happen regularly.

  • DAs Join Calls For ICE To Stop Courthouse Arrests

    New York City Patch

    Three of New York City's five district attorneys joined calls Wednesday for Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents to stop arresting immigrants at local courthouses, arguing the practice threatens the city's justice system.

    Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr., Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez and Bronx DA Darcel Clark joined the recent push by public defenders and activists to protect immigrants who make legally mandated court appearances.

  • The showdown over the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act

    CBS News

    Of all the political and cultural issues that divide red states from blue ones, none is more volatile than guns and who can carry them.

    Conservative rural states like Arizona and West Virginia allow almost anyone to carry a loaded firearm in public, while in urban states and big cities, it can be a felony.

    But a piece of legislation quietly churning its way through Congress may change all that by making gun permits more like driver's licenses, transportable across state lines. If you are allowed to carry a concealed weapon in your home state, you would be allowed to carry it in all of them.

  • Turnstile justice? Manhattan eases up on fare jumpers

    The Associated Press

    Fare beaters who hopped over grimy subway turnstiles back in the early 1990s were the first targets of a policing strategy that went after the smallest offenses and was credited with helping to drive crime down to record lows.

    Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. said his policy, which took effect Feb. 1, doesn’t prevent officers from stopping turnstile jumpers, and that those found to have weapons or an open warrant will be arrested and prosecuted. But a review by his office found that two-thirds of all those arrested in Manhattan for the crime had no prior convictions, and a judge posed no criminal sanctions on those who pleaded guilty, Vance said.

  • Trust-fund creep gets prison for raping unconscious women

    New York Post

    The depraved preppy trust-funder charged with raping and sexually assaulting two unconscious women, while filming it and saving the recordings on his computer in files marked “unconscious” and “rape,” took a 10-year plea deal today in Manhattan Supreme Court.

    Cameron McDermott, 32, of Hempstead, LI, faced up to 25 years in prison for multiple rapes and sexual assaults on two women in Manhattan apartments he occupied in 2010 and 2013.

  • Turnstile Jumping Pits de Blasio Against Police Reformers

    The New York Times

    The subway turnstile — low enough to vault, ubiquitous enough to figure in the lives of millions of New Yorkers each day — has long served as a kind of dragnet for the Police Department. There, officers lie in wait, nabbing those who skip the fare.

    Of late, these rotating entry points and those who jump them have become stumbling blocks for Mayor Bill de Blasio, who despite his liberal credentials, has been vocally opposed to the Manhattan district attorney’s office's new policy of declining to prosecute most who are arrested over fare evasion.

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